The Peril of Power: How Security Administrators Can Avoid the Self-Destruct Button

Avoid-the-self-destruct-btn_blog_main_646x300Security administrators spend countless hours building defenses for their data centers against unauthorized users and hackers, but sometimes they are the greatest risk to their own data center security. They hold all the power, and they have none of the same roadblocks when gaining access to a server, so the possible damages and setbacks they can cause are significant. Also, since system access is constantly available, errors that can cause long-term disruptions are more likely.

With the right security protocol for such cases, administrators can add an extra layer of security to avoid wiping out or rendering useless terabytes of high-value data. The best defense is a storage solution that can protect against unauthorized, accidental or deliberate attempts to modify or destroy data. These storage solutions operate under a prevailing security protocol that supersedes the commands from any administrator.

As an example, a law firm may set its storage policy to archive all files for a minimum of five years. If an administrator tries to step in and delete or modify a protected file before the five years have passed, they will be denied. This also protects against viruses, worms or hack attempts, so it’s a sound approach to holistic security.

For administrators looking to add this layer of security to their data centers, we recommend deploying Imation’s Lock & Key technology. Lock & Key delivers two-factor authentication through Imation’s IronKey and its Nexsan Assureon secure archive storage solution, which is specifically designed to protect against unauthorized access. In addition, Assureon’s industry-leading file fingerprinting technology guarantees file integrity by providing a clear history and chain-of-custody for each file in the archive.

Lock & Key is a component of Imation’s Secure Data Movement Architecture (SDMA), a set of technologies that actively safeguards high-value data from hand to cloud.


The Peril of Power: How Security Administrators Can Avoid the Self-Destruct Button

Security administrators spend countless hours building defenses for their data centers against unauthorized users and hackers, but sometimes they are the greatest risk to their own data center security. They hold all the power, and they have none of the same roadblocks when gaining access to a server, so the possible damages and setbacks they can cause are significant. Also, since system access is constantly available, errors that can cause long-term disruptions are more likely.

With the right security protocol for such cases, administrators can add an extra layer of security to avoid wiping out or rendering useless terabytes of high-value data. The best defense is a storage solution that can protect against unauthorized, accidental or deliberate attempts to modify or destroy data. These storage solutions operate under a prevailing security protocol that supersedes the commands from any administrator.

As an example, a law firm may set its storage policy to archive all files for a minimum of five years. If an administrator tries to step in and delete or modify a protected file before the five years have passed, they will be denied. This also protects against viruses, worms or hack attempts, so it’s a sound approach to holistic security.

For administrators looking to add this layer of security to their data centers, we recommend deploying Imation’s Lock & Key technology. Lock & Key delivers two-factor authentication through Imation’s IronKey and its Nexsan Assureon secure archive storage solution, which is specifically designed to protect against unauthorized access. In addition, Assureon’s industry-leading file fingerprinting technology guarantees file integrity by providing a clear history and chain-of-custody for each file in the archive.

Lock & Key is a component of Imation’s Secure Data Movement Architecture (SDMA), a set of technologies that actively safeguards high-value data from hand to cloud.